Fostering Glossary

When you first step into the world of fostering, the terms can seem complex so here’s a fostering glossary with a few of the most common yet unusual terms you’ll need to know. If you’re still unsure or feel that anything is unclear, please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

These are provided to carers to cover living costs and to provide remuneration for the hard work that is put in. Fees and allowances are variable and take into consideration the context of individual cases.

A Care Order may be granted if it is considered unsafe for a child to live at home.
Legal parental responsibility for the looked after child or young person is either placed exclusively with the Local Authority or shared between the local authority and the child’s birth parents. The local authority takes responsibility for major decisions regarding the child or young person’s welfare and can place a child or young person with a foster carer registered with them, or with an IFA. They also look after who has contact with the child or young person.

Fostering provides a secure and caring home for children and young people who are unable to live with their parents.

Swiis is an IFA and works in partnership with local authorities and health trusts to provide placements for looked after children and young people.

As legal guardians of looked after children and young people, local authorities have a network of their own foster carers and carers registered with IFAs, with whom they place children and young people.
Children living with foster carers may have short stays (typically a weekend or one to two weeks) with another foster family to give their main carers a break. View the different types of foster placements.

A Sanctuary Seeking child or young person is someone under 18 years of age who is separated from parents/family and is applying for asylum in their own right. Foster carers with this type of placement must respect cultural and religious beliefs held by Sanctuary Seeking children or young people.